Try again! Look around your local area to see what kinds of animal experience you could get – it never hurts to ask! They often travel to farms or ranches to care for these animals. Working at a livestock farm can also help you gain valuable animal experience. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 751,687 times. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. Not quite! This will teach you practical skills from professionals in the field, and improve your employment prospects in the future. This article was helpful! In comparison, the average annual tuition for out-of-state students is $46,000. These courses are usually fairly flexible (so you continue to work if you need to) and a lot of colleges offer them. ", "It was very helpful because I needed to know about becoming a small animal vet. If you’re wondering how to become a vet or if the career is right for you, keep these things in mind: There are many specialties you can pursue within veterinary medicine, including pet care, equine science, zoological medicine, reptile and amphibian practice, exotic companion mammal practice, and many more. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. Some universities will accept a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma qualifications in a subject like Applied Science or Animal Management (if there is a strong science focus). Once you have your qualifications, you’ll be ready to move on to your degree. You will need to pass these examination with a minimum score in order to be licensed to practice. Following your schooling through a professional veterinary college program, you will earn a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. These courses consist of many advanced science courses, such as biochemistry, organic and inorganic chemistry, and physics. For example, an avian vet will only tend to birds. Getting involved in training pets can be super helpful, as can having a child help out if you care for animals in any way beyond keeping pets, such as a rescue home, a farm or breeding animals. Access to Higher Education (HE) is a great way for people over the age of 19 to gain the qualifications needed to progress on to a degree. Not quite! In addition to their breadth of knowledge, veterinarians must also have strong communication skills, as the job entails working with both animals and their owners or trainers. ", "I'm writing a story with a vet character, so I needed to know the basics. There are different career roles you can choose, such as Service Desk Technician, Veterinarian Surgeon or a Veterinarian Technician, so be sure to excel at appropriate classes for those. What is the average annual tuition for in-state students attending veterinary college in the United States? You may find that you work at more than one, but this will be good in the long run as it helps build a variety of experience. When you start working, you might come across reptiles, so you should learn how to handle them. Clinical practice, especially with livestock, can be dangerous and physically demanding. Veterinary experience only qualifies as work done under a veterinarian. Pick another answer! It will be hard to manage a job in addition to your schooling, especially during the first year. ", "Great, thank you, while I read this it made me look at my future.". Choose another answer! Salaries starting out in the veterinary field are much lower than those of other equivalent professions, such as dentists or physicians. If you’re thinking of becoming a vet, it’s always good to know what’s coming, right? Read on for another quiz question. Some universities may have different entry requirements for students with certain circumstances. Try another answer... Not exactly! You also need to have also achieved good results in a range of subjects including the sciences for your GCSEs (or National 5s in Scotland). The Access to HE qualifications are a diploma. Some vets might work only day shifts, others might work only emergency night shifts and some may do both on a rota. This is a useful site! B” to his clients, is a Veterinarian and the Owner of Boston Veterinary Clinic, a pet health care and veterinary clinic with two locations, South End/Bay Village and Brookline, Massachusetts. Last Updated: July 22, 2020 What qualifications do I need to become a vet? Keep in mind, however, that reptiles are less likely to be handed in, unless you are a wildlife vet. $46,000 is the average annual tuition for out-of-state students. During the first two years, you will focus on a breadth of subjects in science in order to build the basic framework for your education. Alternatively, you can pass the GED exam. Correct! As a vet you will need to speak with owners or other people who are looking after animals throughout your career, so you need to be patient and understanding. You may also get vets who prefer to treat more unique pets (called “exotics” by vets), such as small pets, birds or reptiles, or those who have an interest in wildlife or zoo animals. If you really want to become a vet, it's best to get used to handling all types of animals. There may also be bank loans available to help cover the cost of a higher education qualification. Boston Veterinary Clinic is an AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association) accredited hospital and Boston’s first and only Fear Free Certified Clinic. Our Expert Agrees: In the veterinary field, people often say that the top requirement is that you have to like animals. However, some schools accept the MCAT as well. ", "This information will definitely help me for the future in becoming a vet. Looking to get some more experience? Enter in a resume and ask to speak to the manger about work experience or you can call from home. This could be work, shadowing or voluntary placements at a cattery, kennels, rehoming centre, farm, stables or any other relevant experience (e.g. Boston Veterinary Clinic specializes in primary veterinary care, including wellness and preventative care, sick and emergency care, soft-tissue surgery, dentistry. Nope! So plan your finances accordingly. 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