[6] A fourteenth-century Latin medical glossary has an entry for uligo, described as "a certain fatty substance emitted from the earth, that is commonly called 'a star which has fallen'". Sudden she stops nor longer can endure "Nature 1, Science 0 as finest minds fail to explain star jelly", The Promptorium Parvulorum: The First English-Latin Dictionary, "About the So-Called 'UFO Rings' and Fungi", "Recent observations of "mystery star jelly" in Scotland appear to confirm one origin as spawn jelly from frogs or toads", "Did Mrs. Sybil Christian of Frisco, Texas, find blobs from space on her lawn? Star jelly (also called astromyxin, astral jelly) is a gelatinous substance sometimes found on grass or even on branches of trees. Laichballen auf Baumstümpfen, Baumstubben etc. [1] According to folklore, it is deposited on the Earth during meteor showers. In many areas, jelly-like fungi seem to appear out of nowhere when moisture is abundant, sending home gardeners scrambling for answers. Do's run apace, Star jelly is described as a translucent or grayish-white gelatin that tends to evaporate shortly after having "fallen." [10], The Oxford English Dictionary lists a large number of other names for the substance, with references dating back to the circa-1440 English-Latin dictionary entry mentioned above: star-fallen, star-falling, star-jelly, star-shot, star-slime, star-slough, star-slubber, and star-slutch. "stella terre, que est quedam mucillago jacens super terram, prohibet apostemata calida in principio", from John of Gaddesden, "Rosa Medicinae" or "Rosa Anglica", Venice edition of 1502, folio 28. Explanations have ranged from the materials being the remains of frogs, toads, or worms, to the byproducts of cyanobacteria, to the paranormal. The Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes. Find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: Keep up to date with all that's happening in and around the garden. "Catch a Falling Star". In The Book of British Amphibians and Reptiles (page 138), author M. Smith states that star jelly is most likely formed from the glands in the oviducts of frogs and toads. If jelly fungi are widespread and feeding on your tree’s trunk, however, you should call in a professional arborist to assess the health of your tree. Any advice? [9] Similarly, an English-Latin dictionary from around 1440 has an entry for "sterre slyme" with the Latin equivalent given as assub (a rendering of Arabic ash-shuhub, also used in medieval Latin as a term for a "falling" or "shooting" star). Star jelly is a gelatinous substance sometimes found on grass or even on branches of trees. In the 2011 novel The Isle of Blood by Rick Yancey, star jelly (referred to as "Pwdre Ser" in the story) is the saliva of a monster called "Magnificum" that falls to earth along with blood and shredded human remains, sometimes weaved into a nest or bowl of sorts, known as a "nidus". And like that falling Meteor, there she lyes Trees with hidden internal rot are serious hazards in the landscape and by calling in an expert, you can prevent injury to your home and the people around it. Establish dill, catnip, yarrow or Queen Anne's lace near your peach tree to attract aphid-eating insects. The jellylike substance oozing from this peach tree is called gummosis and can result from environmental stress, mechanical injury, or disease and insect infestation. It can result from environmental stress, mechanical injury, or disease and insect infestation. In 1910, T. Mckenny Hughes ruminated in Nature as to why meteors were associated with star jelly by poets and ancient writers, and observed that the jelly seemed to "grow out from among the roots of grass". With rapid transient Blaze, she runs, she flies; A fungal disease causes trees to secrete a clear gelatin-like substance. In many areas, jelly-like fungi seem to appear out of nowhere when moisture is abundant, sending home gardeners scrambling for answers. Anyone who comes in contact with Pwdre Ser becomes "infected", and will slowly decline in health until they are literally a living corpse. An unidentifiable substance that falls to earth during a meteor-type event forms the background to "The Colour Out of Space", a 1927 short story by the American horror and science fiction author H. P. Lovecraft. The Drama to 1642, Part Two. That the Starres eat...that those falling Starres, as some call them, which are found on the earth in the form of a trembling gelly, are their excrement. II. Though jelly fungus on trees looks insidious, this is usually a beneficial organism. With our brand new eBook, featuring our favorite DIY projects for the whole family, we really wanted to create a way to not only show our appreciation for the growing Gardening Know How community, but also unite our community to help every one of our neighbors in need during these unprecedented times.

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